PS 232 Students Create Signs For Safety

BY LUIS GRONDA
Staff Writer

Whether you are  driving or walking around PS 232, you will now be reminded that “alert and ready wins the race.”

Students at PS 232 in Lindenwood created street signs to raise awareness about the dangerous intersection that surrounds their school. The signs are part of an initiative by the school to curtail dangerous driving and improve safety for pedestrians during the school’s dismissal time.

Parents, school officials and local elected officials have been calling on the Dept. of Transportation to install some kind of a traffic fixture for the kids at the school, either a street light or a stop sign. The area is known to be dangerous for pedestrians after school, with cars speeding up and down 83rd Street and 153rd Avenue.

The sign created by students at PS 232 was installed outside of their school, to raise awareness about a dangerous intersection in the area. Photo by Luis Gronda

The sign created by students at PS 232 was installed outside of their school, to raise awareness about a dangerous intersection in the area. Photo by Luis Gronda

State Sen. Joe Addabbo (D-Howard Beach) held a rally outside the school last summer to raise awareness about the situation and has also been advocating for a safety improvement.

While there is still no safety measure placed outside the school, the students of class 702 created a sign that reminds drivers to slow their roll.

The sign itself features a green figure with a backpack on, walking on a crosswalk. Close to it is a yellow car that is near the person. On the crosswalk itself is reads “alert and ready” and the bottom right hand corner finishes the slogan with “wins the race.” PS 232 was selected as one of eight schools in New York City to be a part of this program.

The students created the sign after enrolling on a DOT program called “Artists for Safer Streets: Traffic Safety Sign Design Residency Program,” which allows artists to create work related to traffic safety.

Lisa Josephson, the school’s principal, said despite initial skepticism from her, she was convinced that the sign would help the situation and allow the kids to use their creativity to send a message.

“We have been waiting for this day now for a very long time,” Josephson said, adding that she has been petitioning DOT to improve safety surrounding the school.

Jamie Lopez, a student from class 702, said it took the class about 10 weeks to finish the design and they were very satisfied with the result once they finished.

Reach Luis Gronda at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127, lgronda@queenstribune.com, or @luisgronda.