JUDY LIMPERT: A Staple In The Business Community

BY LUIS GRONDA
Staff Writer

Judy Limpert fell in love with Bayside as soon as she began to work in the neighborhood and has worked to be strong advocate for it.

She has been heavily involved in the northern Queens area since she started working in Bayside in 1988.  Before taking on her current position as a relationship manager at Alma Bank, she was the branch manager at two other banks, Chase and North Fork.

limpertLimpert said she began as a part-time teller when she entered the banking business and moved up the ladder without much resistance. She said the industry that she is involved in is one that does not frown upon women achieving prominence.

“Banking is one of the areas where women can rise to the top,” she said. “A smart boss or leader can see the potential in people and bring that out of them.”

Growing up as one of eight children, with five sisters and two brothers, Limpert said that contributed to her success because it allowed her to develop her strengths and know her limitations that she can take into other aspects of her life.

“It gives you a base of success,” she said.

Another of Limpert’s achievements was the founding of the Bayside Business Association, an organization that focuses on bringing establishments on major thoroughfares like Bell Boulevard together and giving them a voice in the area.

Limpert said she started the BBA because there was no formal business organization representing the storefronts in Bayside and they needed to form a group to be able to advocate for themselves.

Among the services the BBA offers are seminars for businesses that are looking to address any questions they may have about running a business or programs that would be of interest to them. They have also given back to the community over the years, including Bayside High School, which Limpert said they have given more than $100,000 for various projects and events. They also help organize events like the Taste of Bayside, which is scheduled for May 13 this year.

The birth of the BBA eventually led to the founding of another prominent organization, the Bayside Village Business Improvement District. BIDs are made up of several businesses within a given community that also advocate for needs of storefronts. There are several throughout Queens, including ones in Woodhaven, Long Island City and Flushing.

Although Limpert made sure to point out that the Bayside BID is a separate entity from the BBA, she said the BID has been a welcomed addition to the area because it has allowed the establishments to pay for their own businesses through the funding that the BID gets from the City.

Limpert lives in Woodhaven, but has always been heavily involved in Bayside. When asked what she likes about the neighborhood, she described it as “a small community within a big city,” that has the feel of a small town, but is not desolate either, with a lively commercial strip like Bell Boulevard.

“I instantly felt that community here,” she said, adding that while she loves Bayside, she does not want to live where she works.

Limpert said she keeps busy with all the community involvement she is a part of, including being a member of the Bayside Kiwanis club.

“I try to do anything I can to keep involved,” she said.

Reach Luis Gronda at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127, lgronda@queenstribune.com, or @luisgronda.