Jackson Heights Man Plans Run To WTC Top

BY TRISHA SAKHUJA
Staff Writer

A Jackson Heights resident will climb 72-flights of stairs with his team, “LEG-ends of the Hidden Temple,” at the newly opened 4 World Trade Center, on April 3.

Conor McCoy intends to climb to the top floor of the building, operated by Silverstein Properties, to raise money for the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation.

He will be one of more than 25 participants to represent Queens.

“I feel positive about representing Queens,” he said. “It’s where I am from and it’s where I was raised.”

As for prepping for the race to the top, McCoy said he has been cycling daily.

“I just want to be able to make it to the 72nd floor,” he said. “I have been going to the gym and trying to get back into shape. Mentally, I am going to go in there with a positive state of mind.”

Even though McCoy did not lose a loved one during the Sept. 11 attacks, he said this event holds significance because he would travel in close proximity to Ground Zero in 2002.

“I am looking forward to being inside the building,” he said. “It gives New Yorkers a new sense of hope and a new sense of direction.”

To date, more than 500 participants have raised $82,000 for cancer research. Hundreds of them are gearing up to climb to the top as corporate teams and individual participants, including cancer survivors, their friends and family members.

McCoy said he is participating in honor of his aunt in Ireland, who was recently diagnosed with throat cancer.
Lorraine Egan, president and chief executive officer of the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, said 4 World Trade Center is a symbol of innovation and resilience. It will soon be the sixth-tallest building in the City.
She said it is “an appropriate venue to champion commitment to the cutting-edge researchers who are marking the medical breakthroughs of tomorrow.”

“All proceeds from Runyon Up will allow us to support the best and brightest young cancer researchers in the nation,” Egan added. “Our participants help make life-saving discoveries.”

Reach Trisha Sakhuja at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 128, tsakhuja@queenstribune.com, or @Tsakhuja13.