IndieCade Game Festival Returns To Astoria

BY TRISHA SAKHUJA
Staff Writer

A three-day festival celebrating independent video games is returning to the Museum of Moving in Astoria for its second year.

The East coast edition of the nation’s video game festival, IndieCade East, will run from Feb. 14-16.

“We are excited to build on the success of last year’s IndieCade East, and to welcome game makers and players to the Museum to celebrate the art, technology and business of independent game design and production,” said Carl Goodman, executive director of the Museum of the Moving Image.

At IndieCade East last year, attendees played Kaho Abe’s “Hit Me!,” a two-player, hyper-interactive, physical game that tests speed, agility and the ability to take good snapshots. Photo by Lauren Naefe / Museum of the Moving Image

At IndieCade East last year, attendees played Kaho Abe’s “Hit Me!,” a two-player, hyper-interactive, physical game that tests speed, agility and the ability to take good snapshots. Photo by Lauren Naefe / Museum of the Moving Image

Stephanie Barish, founder and CEO of IndieCade, which supports independent game development globally through a series of international events, said last year’s collaboration with the Museum was a success, so they decided to return for year two.

“With game creators from the region and beyond hosting screenings, giving talks and presenting their games for gameplay, IndieCade East will provide a window to powerful creative visions from around the world,” Barish said.

“All weekend we’ll spotlight work that provokes thought and conversation, and that pushes the boundaries of interactive entertainment and how we see games.”

The weekend will feature more than 30 talks, workshops and panels headlined by a group of game makers, academics, artists and journalists. Seminars and workshops for budding creators, an eSports tournament, Night Games East, party-style gameplay, Show and Tell Showcase and opportunities to experience new games will all be available for visiting patrons.

One of the workshops, led by the New York-based Code Liberation Foundation, will encourage female participation in game development, plus an inside look at the creation of a new indie gaming conference in Japan.

The Show and Tell Showcase will consist of emerging game developers with the opportunity to present their latest creations to an audience of game makers and avid gamers.

This year’s keynote speakers include New York-based game maker and New York University professor Bennett Foddy, developer of the Flash-based physics simulation game “QWOP” and Auriea Harvey, co-founder of the Belgian company Tale of Tales, creator of the gothic story game “The Path.” Both games are featured in the exhibition “Indie Essentials: 25 Must-Play Video Games,” along with 24 other independent game titles from the last decade, which will be on view at the Museum through March 2.

Festival passes are on sale now with an early-bird special. Regular tickets are $100 and $80 for students, seniors and Museum members. Beginning Feb. 1, festival passes will be $125 for the public and $100 for students, seniors and Museum members.

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.movingimage.us/films/2014/02/14/detail/indiecade-east-2014 or call (718) 777-6800.

Reach Trisha Sakhuja at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 128, tsakhuja@queenstribune.com, or @Tsakhuja13.