Flushing House Offers Two-Week Trial

17 FH aerial photo

Flushing House is giving seniors a chance to try out
its services in a two-week trial stay.

BY JOE MARVILLI
Staff Writer

Looking for a retirement home is an important step in any senior citizen’s life. But determining where to spend your golden years can be difficult with just a quick tour and a couple of brochures. That is where Flushing House and its two-week trial comes in.

Flushing House, a not-for-profit independent living retirement community, is offering seniors the chance to live there for two weeks, to see if it is the right location for them. By letting them live in the home and giving them all the benefits offered to residents, seniors get a better idea of whether or not they want to stay.

The deal was conceived several years ago as a way to introduce Flushing House and its members to interested parties in a more invested manner than just the usual tours.

“The idea is to give senior citizens, older adults, who are interested in Flushing House as a potential place for them to live, an opportunity to live here for a couple of weeks. To get their feet wet, so to speak,” Robert Salant, director of community relations, said. “After their two week stay, there’s no obligation for them to make a decision right away. We’d love them to move in. We have a number of studios available.”

Seniors can try out the rooms for $30 per night, equaling a grand total of $390 for two weeks. For those who would rather try out a new place with a relative or friend nearby, a room can be rented for a couple for $50 per night.

“Sometimes, they will come for their two-week stay with their daughter or a friend, so they won’t have to be alone for that period of time. Fifty dollars a night for a couple to stay in a furnished studio is an incredible bargain,” Salant said.

Flushing House is the largest not-for-profit independent living retirement community in the State, with more than 300 apartments in a 12-story building. Within its walls, seniors enjoy a comfortable, furnished apartment, continental breakfast, lunch and dinner, 24-hour security, a comprehensive activities program with state-of-the-art computer learning, fitness centers, an arts and crafts room, concerts, movies, game nights, weekly trips and more. Catholic, Jewish and Protestant religious services are held weekly in its interfaith chapel. Flushing Hospital Medical Center also operates a satellite geriatric clinic on the premises.

At the moment, there are 280 residents in the building who take advantage of its services, with a maximum capacity of 300. The two-week trials have been successful at drawing new residents, with more than 50 percent of those who take the trial deciding to stay.

“We do have a good batting average. The average is that those who take a two-week stay, about 65 percent of them convert or roll over into a permanent move-in, either immediately or after a while,” Salant said. “I think it speaks well for us as a retirement community.”

Salant added that Flushing House’s status as a not-for-profit helps it stand out from the competition.

“We’re not-for-profit. We’re tax-exempt. We’re registered as a charity. We’re not public. We have no shareholders. We’re not assisted-living. We’re independent living,” he said. “Therefore, our costs are lower. The cost of our studio is $2,500 a month, where assisted living is $4,000-$5,000 a month. The money we collect from our rent and activities go right back into Flushing House. We’re great value for the dollar.”

All applicants must be pre-qualified. Call (347) 532-3000 or call its toll-free number, (888) 987-6205, to set up your pre-qualification interview and reserve your two-week stay. Flushing House is located at 38-20 Bowne St., Flushing.

Reach Joe Marvilli at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 125, jmarvilli@queenstribune.com, or @Joey788.