Bill Puts Accountability On Pothole Repairs

BY TRISHA SAKHUJA
Staff Writer

Councilman Costa Constantinides (D-Astoria) announced a bill that would codify the City’s pledge to make pothole repairs more efficient.

During a press conference on March 7, Constantinides explained the bill would require the City to fill a pothole within five days after a call is put in to 311.

Councilman Costa Constantinides stood in front of Dunkin Donuts in Astoria to announce a bill that would codify the City’s pledge to make pothole repairs more efficient. Photo by Trisha Sakhuja

Councilman Costa Constantinides stood in front of Dunkin Donuts in Astoria to announce a bill that would codify the City’s pledge to make pothole repairs more efficient. Photo by Trisha Sakhuja

“This bill is, at its heart, a good government bill,” he said. “It will give peace of mind to those that call 311 that potholes will be repaired within a five-day time-frame demonstrating our responsiveness to their call.”

Constantinides said, his bill “would codify good practice and set our expectations high for years to come.”

The Councilman sponsored this legislation on the heels of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s comprehensive plan with the Dept. of Transportation to combat potholes, launched in late February.

According to the press release, the City will allocate an additional $7.3 million to the DOT, which will go toward pothole blitzes, targeted repaving for areas in dire need of repair, industry-leading maintenance materials, efficiency and even better interagency coordination.

“I want to make sure to put the sentiment behind the Mayor’s plan into so law so that we know our City will continue to work for our people for years to come,” Constantinides said. “Making that good practice a part of the law because administrations change, but the administrative code doesn’t.”

Robert Piazza, chair of the Community Board 1 Transportation Committee, said because of the recent snowstorms and freezing temperatures, potholes and road maintenance are on top of the issues that he hears about daily from his community members.

“They are worse than I have ever seen them because of the freezing and the refreezing,” Piazza said. “I think if we put something like this in place, it gives us measurement. It’s a goal we can look to. It puts accountability on it.”

Reach Trisha Sakhuja at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 128, tsakhuja@queenstribune.com, or @Tsakhuja13.